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Toenail Fungus

Toenail fungus (onychomycosis) is an infection of the nail and sometimes surrounding tissue. It is extremely common with 20 percent of the general population and 75 percent of people over 60-years-old affected. Often, the problem is cosmetic, but many patients also experience pain. Sometimes toenail fungus can lead to more serious infections.

Toe and Forefoot Fractures

Nearly one-fourth of all the bones in your body are in your feet, which provide you with both support and movement. A broken (fractured) bone in your forefoot (metatarsals) or in one of your toes (phalanges) often is painful but rarely disabling. Most of the time, these injuries heal without surgery. A dislocation can be mistaken for a toe fracture, therefore obtaining X-rays to ensure a correct diagnosis is important.

The Diabetic Foot and Risk

People with diabetes are at risk for foot issues, including the possibility of losing a leg. The risk increases when a person has diabetic neuropathy, a type of nerve damage that causes foot numbness, since problems can go unnoticed. Click the button below to learn how to reduce the risk by properly caring for diabetic feet and seeing a doctor as soon as possible if there is an issue.

Talus Fracture

A talus fracture is a broken ankle bone. The talus is the bone in the back of the foot that connects the leg and the foot. It joins with the two leg bones (tibia and fibula) to form the ankle joint and allows for upward and downward motion of the ankle.

The talus (ankle bone) sits within the ankle mortise or hinge, which is made up of the two leg bones, the tibia and fibula. There are three joints:

Stress Fracture

A stress fracture is a small crack in a bone. These fractures most often are a result of overuse and can occur with an increase in activity. Stress fractures most commonly occur in the weight­bearing bones of the legs. When a bone is subjected to a new stress, such as a new exercise routine, it may not be prepared for the increased workload, and as a result, may develop a stress fracture.

Sesamoid Injuries

Sesamoids are bones that develop within a tendon. The one most people are familiar with is in the kneecap, however they most commonly occur in the foot and hand. Two sesamoids, each about the size of a corn kernel, typically are found near the underside of the big toe.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Foot and Ankle

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease that attacks multiple joints throughout the body. About 90 percent of people with RA eventually develop symptoms related to the foot or ankle. Usually symptoms appear in the toes and forefeet first, then in the middle and back of the foot, and finally in the ankles. Other inflammatory types of arthritis that affect the foot and ankle include gout, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and Reiter's syndrome.

Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are a common viral skin infection on the bottom (plantar) side of your foot. About 10 percent of teenagers have plantar warts. Using a public shower or walking around a locker room in bare feet increase your risk for developing plantar warts.

Plantar Fibroma and Plantar Fibromatosis

A plantar fibroma is a benign (non-cancerous) nodule that grows in the arch of the foot and usually appears between ages 20 and 60. It usually is slow-growing and often less than one inch in size. Some can grow faster and are considered plantar fibromatosis. A plantar fibroma or fibromatosis is a disease of the fibrous tissue that grows between the skin and the underlying fascia.

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