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Total Ankle Arthroplasty

Total ankle replacement, also known as total ankle arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure that foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeons use to treat ankle arthritis. Arthritic changes may be a result of normal wear and tear due to aging or from an injury such as a broken ankle or dislocation. Arthritis eventually leads to loss of cartilage, pain, and/or deformity.

The goal of ankle replacement is to provide pain relief while preserving ankle motion so the patient has less pain and better function during activity. 

Tendoscopy

Tendoscopy is a procedure that allows an orthopaedic surgeon to see the inside of a tendon sheath to treat tendon disorders of the foot and ankle. Tendoscopy is very similar to arthroscopy. A small camera and special instruments are placed through small incisions along the course of a tendon. Sterile fluid is used to expand the sheath and provide direct exposure to the tendon.

Tendon Transfers

A tendon transfer is moving a tendon from its normal, anatomic location to another area of the foot or ankle. Tendons typically are transferred in order to restore more normal movement to a foot and ankle that has lost function. A common problem is loss of the ability to raise the foot up, which is called foot drop. This can result from nerve or muscle damage due to stroke, injury, or other diseases. This muscular weakness or paralysis decreases movement and can lead to the foot becoming bent or twisted, making it difficult or painful to stand, walk or wear shoes.

Talar Fracture Surgery

The talus bone makes up part of the ankle joint and the subtalar joint. The ankle joint allows for up-and-down motion and the subtalar joint supports side-to-side motion. A talar fracture is a break in the talus bone that often involves both of these important joints. 

Surgery for the Syndesmosis

The two bones in the lower leg are the tibia and the fibula. The point just above the ankle where these two bones meet is called the syndesmosis. While technically a joint, it does not function like most joints as there is very little motion between the two bones. Its main functions are to provide stability to the ankle joint and allow for motion of the joint.

Subtalar Fusion

The subtalar joint is located just below the ankle joint between the talus and the calcaneus (heel bone). The main job of the subtalar joint is to allow for side-to-side movement of the foot and ankle. This movement aids in walking, especially on uneven surfaces.

When there is a problem in the subtalar joint, the location of pain is described as being deep. The exact location may be hard to describe. Pain may be felt in the soft spot on the outside of the ankle or in a horseshoe distribution behind and below the ankle.

Subtalar Arthroscopy

The subtalar joint is located just below the ankle joint between the talus and the calcaneus (heel bone). The main job of the subtalar joint is to allow for side-to-side movement of the foot and ankle. This movement aids in walking, especially on uneven surfaces.

Parts of the ankleWhen there is a problem in the subtalar joint, the location of pain is described as being deep. The exact location may be hard to describe. Pain may be felt in the soft spot on the outside of the ankle or in a horseshoe distribution behind and below the ankle.

Posterior Ankle Endoscopy or Arthroscopy

Posterior ankle endoscopy/arthroscopy is a technique used to look at and treat problems in the back of the ankle. 

First, it’s important to understand ankle anatomy. The ankle joint is the joint between the lower leg bones (tibia and fibula) and the ankle bone (talus). The joint below the ankle joint is called the subtalar joint; it lies between the ankle bone and the heel bone (calcaneus). The talus has a bony prominence in the back next to the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon. This is the tendon that moves the big toe downward toward the floor.

Pilon Fracture Surgery

The tibia (shin bone) and the fibula are the bones of the lower leg. Pilon fractures are injuries that occur at the lower end of the tibia and involve the weightbearing surface of the ankle joint. The fibula also may be broken. These injuries were first described more than 100 years ago and remain one of the most challenging problems for orthopaedic surgeons to treat. Common causes of pilon fractures are falls from a height and car accidents. 

Peroneus Longus to Achilles Tendon Transfer

A peroneus longus (PL) to Achilles tendon transfer is done to restore strength across the ankle joint. Strength may have been lost due to an injury to the Achilles tendon or a neurological disorder. Also, patients with Achilles tendon pain that has not improved from non-surgical treatment may benefit from this transfer. Other tendons (such as the tendon to the big toe or lesser toes) may be chosen for the transfer instead of the PL, based on the underlying anatomy and function.

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